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6 posts from October 2013

10/28/2013

Escape, by Matt Mantikas, CIEE Palma de Mallorca

I’ve been dreading this day for a while, but it’s finally here. Today, I feel like I could be in Maine. It’s windy, overcast and probably about 55 degrees. Yes, I’m still wearing shorts, a tee shirt, sunglasses and flip-flops but people I passed in the street this morning were wearing winter coats. These people legitimately wouldn’t survive in a climate with real seasons. Regardless, tonight is some kind of courting ritual type thing in Mallorca called “Día de las Vírgenes” where teenage guys get in groups and serenade the girls that they like at their houses. It’s a nice Mallorcan tradition and what’s even nicer is that the girls are essentially obligated to give their serenaders donut type things called “buñuelos” (slightly bigger than Dunkin Donuts munchkins and made with potato dough).
How is this relevant to me? Well, I’m glad you asked. Due to the impending holiday, they’re being sold on the street all over Mallorca right now, so I bought ¼ kilo of them (more than ½ pound) and ate them on my way to the University this morning. I didn’t want to eat all of them, but I had to in the name of culture. It’s the same reason why I buy a chocolate filled croissant on my way to class every Monday/Wednesday. 1.) Stimulation of the Spanish economy, 2.) Appreciation of the culinary culture. I’m obviously not just doing it because I’m fat.
Since my last post, my group went on an overnight hiking trip to Soller. Having been in a city for the past month, it was refreshing to be in the mountains. I’m slowly dying of second-hand smoke inhalation here in Palma (everyone smokes) so a mountain escape every once in a while isn’t a bad idea. We stayed in a “Refugee Camp” which was more of a nice hostel situated next to a lighthouse, overlooking the water. I really don’t understand why it’s called a refugee camp. No one there was a refugee (they were mostly German tourists) and I saw no evidence of people camping. There was a place to eat inside, tables outside, a huge room full of bunk beds and pretty nice bathrooms.
Apparently it was €11/person so I think I’ll go back at some point.  Soller itself is gorgeous and, believe it or not, I woke up early enough on Sunday morning to see the sun rise over the mountain. At around 10 that morning we left on what was supposed to be a three-hour hike, but it took us a good deal longer. Our “guardian angel”, David, rolled his ankle on the first day’s hike so our Sunday pace was painfully slow. It was fine though. We weren’t in any kind of rush and it gave us time to stop and look around/enjoy the landscape. Given this immense amount of waiting time, at some point on this journey I saw a fruit growing on a giant cactus and thought to myself “that looks delicious. I think I’ll eat it”. So, being the prepared Maine resident that I am, I took out my knife and cut the fruit off of the cactus. I thought that I had managed to break all of the prickers off of the soft exterior of the fruit, but, of course, I hadn’t. Instead I ended up with dozens of hair-sized needles stabbed into my fingertips and another five or six more in my lip. Moral of the story: do not eat cacti or their seemingly (and actually) delicious fruits. You live and you learn.
Speaking of learning, my classes are going well. I have one more this afternoon then I’m done for the week. I’m actually getting on a plane at 10:20 my time and leaving for Sevilla (southern part of Spain) until Sunday. Going to visit some friends in the CIEE program there so it’ll definitely be a good time.
I feel obligated to put some serious commentary into this post so here it goes. After meeting with my intercambio group this week (the one with three girls) I realized to a greater extent how lucky I am to be an American college student at such a distinguished university. They’re all trying to get into study abroad programs so they can study English in either the U.S. or England. However, this is really hard for them to do because they need to coordinate a lot on their own and there are extremely limited scholarship opportunities for studying abroad. Out of the entire University of the Balearic Islands (about 15,000 students), there is one, yes one, scholarship per year given to a student in order to study in the United States. At Colby the percentage of students who study abroad is close to 70% (30ish % of students electing not to go abroad), so we take this kind of opportunity for granted. This is just something that I’ve been thinking about for the last few days.
Couldn't resist



Soller Port Sunrise

Soller Port Nightfall

Lighthouse

Refugee Camp

Group minus their photographer

The group




you know you wanted front and back



The beginning of the great decision

Delicious

10/22/2013

Fall 2013, Issue 1: CIEE PALMA DE MALLORCA

Greetings from Antonia Ferriol, RD of CIEE Palma de Mallorca.

It's a bright sunny Tuesday (75ºF) in Palma de Mallorca, with one of those blue Mediterranean skies reminding us that Summer season, no matter what the calendar says, is not finished yet...

And here we are planning our next activity: a hike into the mountains of Sierra de Tramuntana, (from the harbour of Sóller to the Bohemian village of Deià) a World Heritage Site for its natural beauty and historical villages. Of course, we will be sleeping in a cabin in the woods by an impressive lighthouse.

Foto divertida

So, what have we been up to?

First week

We navigated the city of Palma, learnt the ins and outs of the narrow streets of the city, its gastronomy, its people, its art (on the second day, Palma celebrated the night of the Art, so all museums were open and free, offered music, new exhibitions... Palma was a huge urban gallery hop!). We placed particular emphasis on showing students how to use public transportation and let them experience Mallorcan traditions, by means of trying typical food and spending time with their familia española.

As usual, the most anticipated event of this week was meeting the Spanish Familias, with whom students will share their lives for the rest of the semester. Everybody looked really excited, so here I would like to share some pictures of this important event:

Homestays 1

Homestays 2
 

Homestays 3


Homestays 4

Homestays 5

Homestays 6

Homestays 7

Homestays 8

 Homestays 9

Orientation 1

We introduced students to two Spanish university students, DAVID and ALI, who will help them feel integrated into the young Palma society. On the second day, David and Ali went shopping with CIEE students, and helped them acquire their cellphone and other things they needed for classes. Students already talk about David and Ali as their true "guardian angels". With David and Ali, students went biking, and hiking in the mountains of Valldemossa to an old hermit.

Deia 4

Intensive Spanish

Liberal Arts students arrived one week earlier in order to take Intensive Spanish, review grammar aspects, and start using as much Spanish as possible before regular university courses start. It is impressive that this year all students compromised very seriously with speaking Spanish at all times, even among themselves. To this day, I have only heart Spanish in the group. So... CONGRATULATIONS! But not only LA students are using Spanish. For some reason, this year Business and Tourism students have come to Palma with enough Spanish to compromise themselves as well to use only Spanish during CIEE actitivies. CONGRATULATIONS again!

Also, this year most of the students have already met their language exchange partner with whom they will meet at least once a week to speak in Spanish and in English, a great opportunity to get exposed first hand to the local culture, and to make a friend.

Estellencs

International students

On the second week, students attended the Welcome reception, organized by the University for all international students. In this event, students were able to meet students from France, Germany, Italy, China, just to mention a few. On top of this, Spanish University students have created an Association to organize activities which bring together Spanish and International students. Among other things, they organize a soccer championship, a night out to eat tapas, an excursion by bus to the cliffs of Formentor and natural beach of Muro, with a stop in Lluc Monastery, and another excursion with an old wood train into the mountains of Soller. CIEE students were able to join many of these activities, and this helped them feel integrated into the university community by making their first friends.

Orientation 2

Classes at the University

After academic advising, and making sure each student had the right class, students went to their first university class. This year, students have enrolled in the following CIEE and UIB classes: Spanish Politics and Society, Contemporary Spanish Cinema and Literature, Intercultural Communication, Spanish for Business and Tourism, Advanced Spanish Writing and Stylistics, Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Marketing Management, Psychology of Development, History of Psychology, Contemporary Spanish Literature, European Union Law, Sustainable Tourism, Business Strategy, Progress of Spain in the International Order, Seminar on Living and Learning, and Introduction to Everyday Catalan.

A.Turmeda

Internship

Four students are doing internships this semester. Karah is teaching English as a Foreign Language to children in a public local school. So far she says she loves the experience and is trying to learn from her mentor professor Silvia the magic of making children be quiet and pay attention in class!

Two other students, Christa and Jenni, are doing their internship at Puro Hotel , one of them in the marketing department and the other in the Events department. Both are not only working at the offices, but helping with several events organized by the hotel, in the coming months.

And Henri is working with a small company named Telm Produccions, which organizes events for children in schools of Mallorca. He will help in these events, and also in the marketing and web design of the company.

Excursions

This Saturday, the group visited La Granja, an old farm which has become a museum about the rural history and traditions of this Mediterranean island.

La granja 1

La granja 2

La granja 3

La granja 4

La granja 5

Afterwards, the group visited the town of Deià, and had lunch at the beach, by the coast of Sierra de Tramuntana, recently declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO for the great value of its unique historical, artistic, and ethnographic heritage. We had the opportunity to admire the landscape of the typical Mediterranean forest: pines, holm oaks, carob trees, fig trees... By the end of the day, we visited the ruins of a watch tower from 16th century, and also the tower of the souls, an example of piracy of the 17th century.

Deia 1

Deia 2

Deia 3

Class Field visits

Language classes have brought students to the well preserved Bellver castle, a round gothic castle with incredible views of the city of Palma.

1 castillo bellver

2 castillo bellver

And to Palma Cathedral, an impressive Gothic building by the sea.

3 catedral

And of course students took a class on how to cook Paella and crespells, a traditional Mallorcan dessert.

4 cooking
Coming next

We went to Granada for three days and had a wonderful time, so in our next newsletter, we will share with you some great stories and more pictures.

Have a great semester!

10/21/2013

Capital, by Matt Mantikas, CIEE Palma de Mallorca

I am very happy here. Obviously there are many aspects of my American life that I miss, but this is a new experience that is being taken in stride.
This past weekend was spent in Madrid. Being the capital city, Madrid is enormous and in two and a half days my group obviously just skimmed the surface of the vast sea of sights. We visited the Prado Museum, the congressional building, the royal gardens, the royal palace, the Museum of Reina Sofia and the “rastro” flea market. We also ate the best bocadillos de calamari (fried calamari sandwiches) in all of Madrid and had famous “churros con chocolate”. Obviously I like anything to do with food but it was also very cool to see paintings by Velázquez, Picasso, Miró, Dalí, El Greco, etc that I had only read about in books during my high school classes. We stayed in a very nice hotel (Hotel Liabeny) that was right in the center of the city (Plaza del Sol). We also had a good amount of free time at night to try different restaurants and thoroughly (and professionally) inspect the nightlife. The girls in my group like to bar hop for sangria, and by obligation I partake. However, I usually have a tapa (and maybe a cerveza or two) at each location rather than sangria. I don’t know what it is about Spanish food, but I’m constantly hungry. I might come home extremely overweight, but it’s all in the name of culture so I’m not too worried about it. Overall the trip was a very good time, but I couldn’t help but notice some peculiar cultural differences as we toured Spain’s noble past in a not so noble present.
Most interesting to me were the reminders of Spain’s rich history coexisting with the politics of today and the economic crisis associated with it. In the same five minutes a visitor can leave a tour of the royal palace, having seen priceless treasures and indescribably ornate grandeur, and walk past three beggars, palms skyward, looking for enough change to get them through the day. I guess this kind of juxtaposition exists in all cities, but never had I seen such an extreme level until this trip to Madrid. Porcelain walls, silk embroidered wallpaper, golden furniture-the list goes on- but what does it all mean when over 20% of the Spanish population is unemployed?  I respect the countless man-hours (and woman-hours) that were spent in creating the art that is the royal palace, but I found it hard to accept its existence and its purpose at this point in time. Obviously it was built in an era of economic stability but I feel that it sends the wrong message to the Spanish people of today. Pride (orgullo) plays a large role in Spanish culture and I’m sure that any Spaniard would say that they are proud of their palace and their history. Fair enough, they should be, but I feel that places like the palace should instead serve as a reminder of what used to be and as a motivation to reach this level once again.
This said, it was interesting to me that even with the problems that Spain is having, after leaving our tour of the Congressional building, we each received a backpack containing a pair of fleece gloves, a hat and a scarf. I was overheard commenting (in Spanish) on this irony to our group leader by a a woman next to me, and she responded that the problems are not with Spain, but with Greece, Italy and Portugal. I don’t possess the Spanish language firepower to win an intellectual argument so I didn’t push the subject, but I was taken aback by how irrational this statement was. Every day on the news in the U.S. a different European country is blamed for market volatility so it's hard to follow exactly what's going on, but do people in Spain really deny that they’re a large part of the problem? Granted, Spanish culture possesses the “tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow” mentality of putting off work but there’s a sizable difference between being laid-back and irresponsible. Do all Spaniards let national and personal pride get in the way of their financial responsibility? No, but given this culture, Spain’s participation in the EU allows for justification of constant finger pointing. Personally, I don’t agree with the “I’ll do it tomorrow” culture that I’ve found here, but I can accept it. I can’t, however, agree with or accept that an entire population can be too proud to feel even partially responsible for such important and serious global economic turmoil. Regardless, I do not have data to back up my opinion and I’m not qualified to make further commentary on this subject (whether you want to hear it or not), but this is a significant cultural difference that I have personally seen here. Whether it’s true for the rest of the population here or not is certainly debatable.
Anyway, economic talk aside, in my “cultural encounters” class we’ve discussed some culture shocks at length and besides the “tomorrow” culture that I’ve referred to at length, there are a few others. Two that share the same theme as “tomorrow” culture are slow paced walking and constant tardiness. Spanish people are notoriously late and no one seems to walk with purpose. New York City has some of the fastest walkers around, and that’s because time is money. The opportunity cost of enjoying a leisurely stroll doesn’t outweigh the money that could be made if the time was spent working. Here in Spain, apparently this isn’t the case. I’m familiar with the term “island time” but this a nationwide phenomenon. As I travel more I’ll definitely report back. And for the record, I do enjoy the tranquility when I don't have anywhere to be. 
I’ve been keeping up my regimen of swimming and biking/running almost every day and my knee has been feeling a lot better. Looking forward to hopefully feeling normal again by the time I get home. I’ve made some friends from England and we’ve been hanging out with international students (called ERASMUS kids: basically a government-paid study abroad program for Europeans) so it’s been very refreshing to branch out from my very small CIEE group.
 
This weekend I’m off to Barcelona for a big concert called “Sensation”. It’s supposed to be unreal. Thousands and thousands of people in a stadium all wearing white. Definitely won’t be bringing my camera but there are plenty of YouTube videos showing the craziness that ensues. I’m flying out of Mallorca alone on Friday but I’m staying with a friend from Colby and a lot of my friends that are abroad in Europe will be there so it’ll be a nice reunion (if I can find them). Until next time.
El Rastro Market (Sundays in Madrid)

The Group at the Royal Palace

Royal Palace/Cathedral

Origin for all distances in Spain

Congress Building

Enjoying our generous gifts in front of the congress building

Speaks for itself

Royal Gardens

One of the Prado Museum buildings

10/16/2013

First weeks in Palma de Mallorca, by Matt Mantikas, CIEE Palma de Mallorca

One of our alumni, Matt Mantikas shared his blog with us. So here it is:
Yesterday marked week two of my stay in España, but, to be honest, it feels like I’ve been here longer. Orientation, language shock, beach trips, moving into a new home, a jaunt to Ibiza and, believe it or not, even some classes, have all transpired in the past 15 days. And I’ve only had time for four siestas. It’s a rough life. In all honesty though, once my tourist feeling subsided and the reality of three and a half months here finally hit me, I found my emotions bittersweet.
 
I’m a notorious loather of cities but Palma seems to be an exception. The main part of the city sits alongside a large port and everything about it is gorgeous. My apartamento is one block away from the iconic cathedral that has greeted all port entrants for centuries. In this Arab district where I live, much of the architecture is, as the name suggests, of Arab influence. It took a while before I was able to successfully navigate the labyrinth of small identical streets but after getting lost for three consecutive nights, I now know my “hood”. Very nearby are the “Plaza del Rey” and “Plaza del Reina”, which are very popular pedestrian (mostly tourist) areas. Also nearby is the “Plaza Mayor”, the focal point of any Spanish city. From it, cobblestone streets lined with shops, bars, cafes and businesses branch out in all directions. Auto traffic on these streets is sparse, and the businesses are packed in one after another.  To me, this is the defining and distinguishing feature of European cities when compared to an American city like New York or Boston.
 
Summer is winding down here in Palma but it’s still mid 70s to 80s and sunny essentially every day. No complaints there except that I need to use the fan in my room 24/7. My room is pretty big compared to a normal Colby single, but I have no windows so airflow is minimal. I live with Carlos, a 50-year-old single man. He’s cool and we speak only in Spanish. He’s also a good cook and does my laundry (he’s forced to do women’s work because he lives alone). The apartment is small but as I stated before, it’s a very nice area. Dinner time is around 8:30 every night. While on the topic of food, tapas are probably my favorite part of Spain. Patatas Bravas are the best. Very simple- they’re basically french fries or hash browns with a spicy sauce on them.
 
I’m starting to make some new international friends. I’d say another negative is that I’m really not a tourist anymore. I actually like being a tourist. A short amount of time in one place, experience the culture for a day or two and move on. I see cruise ships come and go week after week and I honestly envy them. At times I almost feel stuck here when all I want to do is go back on the ship and get a chicken sandwich at the buffet with my friends/family.
 
As for classes, to get to campus I walk 10 minutes to the metro station then take a 20 minute metro ride. Then I walk 15 minutes across campus to my CIEE classroom building (in the hospitality school). My other class is close by in the economics building. I take four CIEE classes and one UIB (Universidad de los Isles Baleares) class. Tourism, Economics and the Environment has two other kids, Business Spanish has one other, Catalan has one other, and Cultural encounters has five others (one being a 56 year old man from Switzerland). My UIB class has about 35 kids in it but 8 are in my classroom and the other 30ish are in classrooms in Menorca and Ibiza (other Balearic islands). We’re all connected through cameras and microphones, which is pretty cool. All classes are in Spanish all the time but I feel like I’m getting very good at understanding essentially everything the professors say. Speaking is where I find the most difficulty because it’s frustrating to have an idea in English that I can’t quite relate the way that I want to in Spanish.
 
Campus also has a very nice athletic facility with a gym, pool, tennis courts and a soccer field. I’ve been there every day this week to swim or run/bike (minimally, still in rehab mode) but I’m glad to have access to these facilities. The gym isn’t just for students at the university, it’s open for people who enroll in memberships so I see a wide array of people there on a regular basis. I’d say that a lot of students don’t go to the gym at all.
 
With that, I have found the main difference between American college culture and Spanish college culture. Here, kids are only at the university to take classes. There’s only one dorm (200-300 kids) and most live at home. They don’t take their studies as seriously as American students and they also don’t have any organized clubs or sports at the school. No one really has school pride. It’s kind of like community college but at a lower level (except for the class difficulty). They don’t sell shirts or sweatshirts or any apparel that says the name of the school and apparently this is common in Europe as a whole. In the U.S. we are literally at school 24/7 and we take more pride in our extracurricular activities than we do our classes. College is literally our life but here it’s just a small aspect. I find this Spanish college culture very difficult to accept. I think this is the reason why I’ve been homesick lately. In high school and now in college, I’ve always had a sense of community but now my community is five girls from my program. It’s just not the same. I know, different is the point of studying abroad but this isn’t the kind of different that I was expecting.
 
IMG_1647
Soller, Mallorca

IMG_1625

Soller, Mallorca

IMG_1409
The group minus 1

IMG_1333
La Catedral

IMG_1146
Carlos and me

IMG_1137
A Mallorcan calle (street)

10/14/2013

A short story: Por qué nunca sale de su cueva la bruja Joana y cómo un monje rompió su voto de silencio, by Camille Meder

Camille
Name: Camille Meder

Semester: Summer 2013

Program: Sarah Lawrence College

 Ya sabrás la leyenda de la bruja Joana, quién ha vivido por muchos siglos, sobreviviendo por sus poderes mágicos, en una cueva cerca del Castillo del Bellver.  Hace siglos que alguien la vio y por eso mucha gente supone que está muerta.  Pero la verdad es que vive todavía pero nunca sale de la cueva. 

Antes, a Joana le gustaba salir y correr por el bosque para cantar y bailar con sus amigas quienes también eran brujas.  A veces Joana visitaba la ciudad de Palma, disfrazada por sus poderes mágicos como una joven hermosa, para ir de compras y crear problemas para los habitantes de Palma.

Un día, mientras estaba en la ciudad de Palma, Joana—porque era una persona muy mala—pensó, “¡Yo sé qué voy a hacer hoy!  Voy a robar a un monasterio.”  Se sintió muy orgullosa de haber concebido una idea tan maliciosa. 

Entonces, todavía disfrazándose como una joven hermosa, entró—mirando para asegurarse de que nadie la veía entrar—en el Convent la Missió.  Pero había un problema: los monjes allí habían tomado un voto de pobreza, y por eso Joana no encontró a nada que quisiera robar de los monjes. 

Mientras buscaba, oyó de repente los sonidos de pies en el suelo y tuvo que esconderse debajo de una mesa.  Vio pasando un monje muy guapo y joven.  Joana nunca había visto un hombre tan guapo en toda su vida.  Se enamoró inmediatamente y salió de debajo de la mesa, confesándole su amor y pidiéndole que se casara con ella.  Pero claro que el monje, por los votos que había hecho, no pudo casarse.  Además, por haber hecho un voto de silencio, no pudo decir nada.  Entonces solamente negó con la cabeza. 

Muy ofendida, y enojada también, Joana pisó fuerte en el suelo y le pidió otra vez, en voz más fuerte, “Cásate conmigo!”  Por sus gritos llegaron corriendo todos los otros monjes y también varias personas desde afuera del monasterio.  Pero otra vez, el monje joven solamente negó con la cabeza. 

Una tercera vez, Joana gritó, “Cásate conmigo!”  Y esta vez, por la fuerza de su tristeza y enfado, su disfraz mágico se desapareció, y se reveló como la bruja vieja y fea que era.  Todos gritaron.  Pero el monje, quien había guardado hasta ahora tan perfectamente sus votos, miró esta escena absurda y ya no pudo mantener su silencio.  Empezó a reírse muy fuerte y sin poder silenciarse.  Y la pobre bruja Joana, llena de vergüenza, se fue corriendo por las calles de Palma hasta que llegó a su cueva y nunca salió otra vez. 

Y así es que un monje rompió su voto de silencio y la bruja Joana se metió en su cueva para nunca  más salir. 

02
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SEMESTER PROGRAMS:

http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/liberal-arts

 http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/business-tourism

SUMMER PROGRAMS:

http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/summer-language-culture

http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/summer-internship-program

o de pod� a h�� 2� Joana no encontró a nada que quisiera robar de los monjes. 

 

Mientras buscaba, oyó de repente los sonidos de pies en el suelo y tuvo que esconderse debajo de una mesa.  Vio pasando un monje muy guapo y joven.  Joana nunca había visto un hombre tan guapo en toda su vida.  Se enamoró inmediatamente y salió de debajo de la mesa, confesándole su amor y pidiéndole que se casara con ella.  Pero claro que el monje, por los votos que había hecho, no pudo casarse.  Además, por haber hecho un voto de silencio, no pudo decir nada.  Entonces solamente negó con la cabeza. 

Muy ofendida, y enojada también, Joana pisó fuerte en el suelo y le pidió otra vez, en voz más fuerte, “Cásate conmigo!”  Por sus gritos llegaron corriendo todos los otros monjes y también varias personas desde afuera del monasterio.  Pero otra vez, el monje joven solamente negó con la cabeza. 

Una tercera vez, Joana gritó, “Cásate conmigo!”  Y esta vez, por la fuerza de su tristeza y enfado, su disfraz mágico se desapareció, y se reveló como la bruja vieja y fea quien era.  Todos gritaron.  Pero el monje, quien había guardado hasta ahora tan perfectamente sus votos, miró esta escena absurda y ya no pudo mantener su silencio.  Empezó a reírse muy fuerte y sin poder silenciarse.  Y la pobre bruja Joana, llena de vergüenza, se fue corriendo por las calles de Palma hasta que llegó a su cueva y nunca salió otra vez. 

Y así es que un monje rompió su voto de silencio y la bruja Joana se metió en su cueva para nunca salir más.  

 

10/01/2013

Riding a Horse in Palma de Mallorca, CIEE Palma Summer program, by Camille Meder

Camille
Name: Camille Meder

Semester: Summer 2013

Program: Sarah Lawrence College

 

 Mi Excursión a Alcudia para Montar a Caballo

 Llegué a Alcudia en autobús después de pasar por campo y ciudad.  En Alcudia, después de salir del autobús, miré por la ventana la arquitectura vieja.  Bajé las escaleras a la calle y encontré un taxi para llevarme al establo. 

Como soy de Texas, y he montado a caballo por muchos años, y trabajo allí en un rancho, me da mucha risa la fascinación que tiene la gente de Mallorca con los “cowboys” y las varias veces que vi en las páginas de Web la palabra “cowboy.”  Conocí a la esposa del dueño de este rancho y pago por una excursión en caballo.  Ella es de Inglaterra, y su esposo es de Mallorca.  Después de explorar un poco y ver a un semental Andaluz (un tipo de caballo que casi nunca se ve en los Estados Unidos), hablé un rato con ella y las otras personas quienes trabajan en el rancho y de cómo pasó que ahora ella vive aquí en Mallorca. 

Después, seleccionaron un caballo para mí.  Era una yegua de color gris quien se llamaba Kana.  Era Española, y me dijo una guía quien viene con nosotros que tenía cinco años.  Con un grupo de personas en caballos—algunos que habían montado antes, y algunos no—fuimos por el paseo rocoso y estrecho.  Miraba siempre la montaña y—aunque estaba en una isla que todavía no era mi hogar, y estaba en un parte de la isla en que nunca había estado antes—me sentí lo más cómoda que había estado antes y aún más contenta cuando la guía nos dijo a yo y otra mujer que ir consiga para un medio galope, y después cuando pasamos más tranquilamente para hablar de los caballos y de las diferencias de la vida en Texas y en Mallorca. 

Después de la excursión, le dije adiós a mi caballo y a la gente del rancho y llamé a un taxi para volver a la parada de autobús.  Regresé a Palma contenta y tranquila. 

Montar caballo 1
montando a caballo

Montar caballo 2vista por la ventana del autobús 

 

Visit CIEE Palma de Mallorca facebook group: 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/cieepalmademallorca

Our blog:

http://study-abroad-blog-palma.ciee.org

And our official websites:

SEMESTER PROGRAMS:

http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/liberal-arts

 http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/business-tourism

SUMMER PROGRAMS:

http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/summer-language-culture

http://www.ciee.org/study-abroad/spain/palma-de-mallorca/summer-internship-program